Tagged Fez

From a crazy city to the blue city

The three day Sahara tour dropped us off at our hostel in Fez. We stayed in Hostel Funky Fes close to the medina.

The Fez medina is the biggest one in the world. And it was crazy.

It seemed like and endless maze. Donkeys were walking beside you, chicken and geese were being sold alive, cats were eating rotten food in the corner, there were loud sounds and intense smells. And you couldn’t ask for directions because everyone was saying a different thing.

“This way, my friend!”

“Where are you going, my brother?”

“I can help you!”

It felt like being in a fantasy movie with witches trying to lure innocent children into their boiling cauldron.

I was ready to lose it. Then suddenly, after walking for what seemed like hours, we turned a corner and saw the restaurant that the hostel staff had recommended to us.

After dinner, we made sure to ask the restaurant staff for directions back to the hostel. “Just walk straight.” But in the medina, there is no such thing. After getting lost again, just minutes after leaving the restaurant, we decided to walk back to the restaurant and grab a taxi to the hostel. For 20 dirham, I say we should have done it straight away.

From Fez we continued north with local bus company CTM.

After a three hour journey, the bus dropped us off at Chefchaouen, a town situated in the Rif mountains. Often called Chaouen by locals, the town used to attract many hippies with its easy-going lifestyle, and still does to some degree. Stepping out of the bus, a strong scent of marijuana immediately floated into my nostrils. Besides weed, Chefchaouen is famous for its blue buildings.

Climbing up towards our hostel we spotted many people wearing straw hats traditional to this area.
Climbing up towards our hostel, Riad Baraka, we spotted many people wearing straw hats and clothing traditional to the area.
Riad Baraka is situated right at the Rif Mountains. Its terrace is a great place for 360 degree views over the town.
Riad Baraka is situated right at the Rif Mountains. Its terrace is a great place for 360 degree views over the town.

So how can a town with nothing but blue buildings be so fascinating?

Well, first of all, every single door is different.

Just like in the rest of Morocco, there are cats everywhere.

In contrast to the blue buildings, locals wear colourful outfits.

 

And walk their goats.

The streets of Chefchaouen feature cute details that make a photographer enthusiastic.

Unfortunately the hygiene standards in Morocco are nonexistent, so on the final day of our trip, I got a gut-wrenching stomach bug that lasted for weeks after the trip. No matter how careful you are, avoiding a stomach bug in Morocco is not easy, but luckily the bug didn’t hit until my final day in Morocco, which allowed me to enjoy every single day of my trip.

Shukran Morocco!